when the world is puddle-wonderful

 

terahertz:

panzerbjoern:

ruinedchildhood:

when the teacher keep teaching after the bell has already rang 

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When you little shits didn’t shut the fuck up so I can do my fucking job and now we both have to stay longer

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typhonatemybaby:

mallelis:

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Remember how everyone’s favorite part of Heath Ledger’s performance in Brokeback Mountain was his almost painful physical repression, his reluctance to express any emotion that wasn’t punching or SHUTTING DOWN? His voice was closed in on itself in a raspy burr — he fell to the ground rather than shed tears — his face was hooded and dark and full of twitching cheek muscles. Kristen Stewart is Heath Ledger, I assure you. She has the same handsome face, the same winsome, masculine smile, the same reluctance to make direct eye contact.

For years, everyone in the world has misunderstood Kristen Stewart’s compressed emotional range. They thought it meant she was a limited actress; it means nothing of the kind. She is John Wayne being forced to play the Maureen O’Hara character. Give her a rail to lean against during a sunset, a military jacket, a toothpick to chew on, and something to squint her eyes against lazily in the distance, and her guardedness will be transformed from unsuccessful femininity to The Great American Male.

Kristen Stewart is a goddamn cowboy.

THIS PUTS INTO WORD THE INTENSE LOVE I HAVE FOR KSTEW BUT IN A SENSIBLE ANALYTICAL MANNER RATHER THAN ME FLAILING AROUND PATHETICALLY

Science

the-right-writing:

Science has been severely misrepresented by authors. If you want to write about scientific worldviews accurately, here are some tips.

  • If a scientist saw something supernatural and could be assured it existed, they wouldn’t scream “that’s impossible!” or try to destroy it because it doesn’t fit their worldview. They would be more likely to say “How interesting. I wonder how this will change my theories. I’d better incorporate it into my worldview.”
  • Scientists have morals just like the rest of us. In fact, many people become scientists because they want to help humanity. How is that so hard to understand?
  • A whole lot of scientists love nature and want to preserve it.
  • Scientists who have helped to create deadly weapons almost always regret it. Politicians who order those weapons to be used don’t.
  • Science in general would be attracted to magic, not repulsed by it. A new thing to study with possible new applications to help mankind? How wonderful!
  • How well a scientist understands people and gets along socially is up to the individual. They’re not an entire profession of evil, cold robots.

(but wouldn’t it be cool if they were?)

bead-bead:

corporatevagina:

pipedreamexplosion:

emmatavasci:

fucktheflagandfuckyou:

fucktheflagandfuckyou:

Say those three words and I’m yours

I hate capitalism

Fuck the police

Abolish wage slavery

Smash the patriarchy

I have chocolate.

As you wish.

whogivesmestrength:

chantelbrenna:

squidsqueen:

What makes me so happy about this is that she isn’t telling you you must love your body or that you are obligated to. She saying you have permission to. And that’s important, because there are a lot of reasons why people have trouble with self-love.  But the idea that you aren’t supposed to love your body, that you aren’t allowed to for whatever reason, needs to be crushed. If you can’t love you body right now, if your body causes you pain or disphoria or distress, you aren’t required to love it. But you are ALLOWED to. You are entitled to the chance to make peace with your body, if you ever reach a point where you are ready to. No one else should be trying to stop you.

Sometimes I see or read things, and I didn’t realize that I needed them until they are two GIFs of Nicki Minaj and some amazing commentary that come across my dash and I instantly burst in to tears and feel a weight lifted off my chest.

This is so important

(Source: beyxnika)

archiemcphee:

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

saathi1013:

…soooo if you’ve met me at a con and then never heard from me? this. exactly this.

saathi1013:

…soooo if you’ve met me at a con and then never heard from me? this. exactly this.

(Source: sarahseeandersen)

I think that if you pursue only those goals that you’re really, really likely to achieve, you live like an iceberg- with the vast majority of yourself undiscovered and unknowable. Even to yourself.

Dessa, in her 2012 University of Minnesota commencement speech. (via dondo-wyndampryce)